IKEA France Goes on Trial for Spying on Customers and Staff Members

IKEA France Goes on Trial for Spying on Customers and Staff Members

Ikea’s French subsidiary and several of its former executives have gone on trial over accusations that they illegally spied on employees and customers.

Trade unions reported the furniture and home goods company to French authorities in 2012, accusing it of collecting personal data by fraudulent means and the illicit disclosure of personal information.

The unions specifically alleged that Ikea France had paid to gain access to police files that contained information about targeted individuals.

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The company fired four executives and changed its internal policy after French prosecutors opened a criminal probe in 2012. But at Monday’s trial in a Versailles court, lawyers for Ikea France denied any strategy of “generalized espionage”.

Ikea’s French subsidiary and several of its former executives have gone on trial over accusations that they illegally spied on employees and customers.

Trade unions reported the furniture and home goods company to French authorities in 2012, accusing it of collecting personal data by fraudulent means and the illicit disclosure of personal information.

The unions specifically alleged that Ikea France had paid to gain access to police files that contained information about targeted individuals.

The company fired four executives and changed its internal policy after French prosecutors opened a criminal probe in 2012. But at Monday’s trial in a Versailles court, lawyers for Ikea France denied any strategy of “generalized espionage”.

An Ikea employee and CGT union activist, Hocine Redouane, said at the trial that the company wrongly suspected him of being a bank robber because their investigation system found criminal records involving a bank robber with the same name.

“Such a system can easily slip into abuse,” Mr. Redouane said.

One accusation alleged that Ikea France used unauthorized data to try to catch an employee who had claimed unemployment benefits but drove a Porsche. Another said the subsidiary investigated an employee’s criminal record to determine how they were able to own a BMW on a low income.

Customers the company was in a dispute with also allegedly had their personal information inappropriately accessed.

Ikea France said on Monday it has co-operated with French judicial authorities and that such activities “seriously undermine the company’s values and ethical standards”.

“Ikea France takes the protection of its employees’ and customers’ data very seriously,” the company said in a statement. It said it adopted compliance and training procedures to prevent an illegal activity after the investigation was opened in 2012.

The former head of Ikea France’s risk management department, Jean-François Paris, acknowledged to French judges that 530,000 to 630,000 euros a year (£454,600 to £540,400) were earmarked for such investigations. Paris, who is among those accused, said his department was responsible for handling it.

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