MoE to use community police to help track down parents of children not attending online classes

MoE to use community police to help track down parents of children not attending online classes

Some 2,000 students from both the primary and secondary system have dropped out of school since the pandemic started in 2020, according to Minister of Education, Nyan Gadsby-Dolly.

She said the figure was provided to her by the School Supervision Division for primary and secondary school students, who revealed that they have not been able to make contact with around 2,000.

In light of this, Gadsby-Dolly said the Ministry of Education is now using community police to help track down the parents of the children who have stopped attending classes.

She said she has spoken to the Police Service, Ministry of Social Development and the Student Support Services Division (SSSD) on this matter before.

“In the circumstances, the SSSD officers may find it difficult to conduct home visits but we do need to locate the students who are not appearing online or collecting packages, so we have developed a protocol and now refining it where we can have the formal intervention of the community police but not to lock up parents,” she told Guardian Media in an online interview.

Approximately 225,000 students are enrolled in primary and secondary schools across T&T.

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